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Discussion Starter #1
First a little background. I started driving EVs in 2012 with a 73-mile Nissan Leaf. That car quickly became our primary driver, covering most of our needs. My wife's car was only used when 1) we needed two cars at the same time (e.g. both commuting to work) or 2) travelling more than about 30 miles from home, which was about once or twice a month.

Today, we have a Bolt EV and a CMax Energi (PHEV). The Bolt has done all of our family trips for the past 2 years (including an annual summer trip of 550-600 miles one-way). We only took the CMax more than 100 miles once in that time, and it was ONLY done to warm up / exercise the gas engine. We are looking to replace the PHEV with a BEV and ditch gas completely. I have no reservations about range.

Now the dilemma. The SE is a great, affordable, and fun option. But there are also other compelling options in the pipeline such as the VW ID.4, which would make our road trips easier. They are larger, longer range, and faster charging than the Bolt. This would be a nice boost for our family of 4 (plus a small dog). The Bolt is the minimum viable size for us. We have made it work, with compromises. For example, I often carry a roofbox which cuts range and increases number and duration of charging stops.

To make matters worse, none of my local Mini dealers have a car that I can go sit in and test drive. I have to put down $500 and wait for months to see in person.

So what do the current owners think? What do you like / dislike about the car? What is it really like driving it? I miss driving small 2-door cars. I used to have a Honda S2000 before children, but the 2-seater just didn't get driven. Before that, I had a Honda Prelude which I absolutely loved. Not the biggest engine, but that thing was low and wide, and gripped the road like it was on rail. It was also FWD (unlike the S2000) but didn't have the torque steer problem I have in the Bolt.
 

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Well it IS a small 2 door. More fun to drive than our Tesla Model 3. And the interior and exterior quality is top notch - BMW level - better than the Model 3. Wireless CarPlay is great. And it is more efficient than the Model 3 around town. But it doesn’t go very far and sure the hatch makes for reasonable space if you fold down the rear seats., but it’s a small car. Great for two around town. Also, like all non- Tesla BEVs, they don’t offer you the best battery management and flexibility options, like setting a charge limit.
 

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Thanks for that. Great to hear that this affordable little EV has BMW-level interior! Too bad about the lack of charge level settings. That's not unique to Tesla though. Both my Bolt and Leaf before it let me limit the max charge level. The newer Bolts let you set the target level in 5% increments from 40-100%.

Let me ask another question. Has any owner ALSO sat in a 2-door Cooper S? How does the size/fit of the interior compare to the SE? There are plenty of S's on lots that I can at least sit in.
 

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Also, like all non- Tesla BEVs, they don’t offer you the best battery management and flexibility options, like setting a charge limit.
One could argue the SE has superior battery management, since you don't have to manually/artificially limit how much you charge it--the BMS takes care of the wear-leveling for you. :wink:
 

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Thanks for that. Great to hear that this affordable little EV has BMW-level interior! Too bad about the lack of charge level settings. That's not unique to Tesla though. Both my Bolt and Leaf before it let me limit the max charge level. The newer Bolts let you set the target level in 5% increments from 40-100%.

Let me ask another question. Has any owner ALSO sat in a 2-door Cooper S? How does the size/fit of the interior compare to the SE? There are plenty of S's on lots that I can at least sit in.
The interior space is pretty much the same as the ICE Minis. I've sat in both and didn't notice a difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I got out to Buffalo, NY this morning where someone had ordered one and backed out. I got to sit in it, turn it on, and play with the buttons/infotainment/etc. They wouldn't let me drive it, but I did drive a 6-speed Cooper S. Wow.

Time to pull out the wallet and get in line! Anyone have any idea how long the waiting list currently is?
 

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One could argue the SE has superior battery management, since you don't have to manually/artificially limit how much you charge it--the BMS takes care of the wear-leveling for you. :wink:
Sadly it doesn’t. Rule no. 1 for battery management is to not leave sitting at 100%. If I left it plugged in it would sit bouncing off 100% like an iPhone. And yes that is 100% (29kwh) based on my calculation of miles and usage all confirmed by Youtubers.

OP, indeed I think sitting in a petrol 2020 Cooper S would give you a good feel of what you would get - with a lot better throttle response and more pep off the line.
 

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Sadly it doesn’t. Rule no. 1 for battery management is to not leave sitting at 100%. If I left it plugged in it would sit bouncing off 100% like an iPhone. And yes that is 100% (29kwh) based on my calculation of miles and usage all confirmed by Youtubers.

OP, indeed I think sitting in a petrol 2020 Cooper S would give you a good feel of what you would get - with a lot better throttle response and more pep off the line.
Except that is 29kWh usable out of a 32.6kWh battery. In other words, "100%" is actually only about 89%. The car won't let you charge to 100%, by design.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yesterday I got to sit in an SE, and test drive and S (they wouldn't let me drive the SE, sadly). I discussed it with my wife and slept on it, and first this thing morning I put down the $500 deposit. Now I wait. Mini says that the current wait time is 4-6 months. I guess I will have my new Mini next spring.
 

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Except that is 29kWh usable out of a 32.6kWh battery. In other words, "100%" is actually only about 89%. The car won't let you charge to 100%, by design.
Correct. They built in a buffer so the customer doesn't have to worry about it.

Further, the owner's manual goes against conventional wisdom and recommends long-term storage at maximum charge:


I won't be charging mine up to 100% every night, but between this and the 8 year/100k mile 70% capacity warranty on the battery, MINI must have confidence in their BMS.
 

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We have a Model 3 as well and are considering buying the Mini Electric as a second car. What charger do you use for the Mini? Have you looked in to putting an adapter on the Tesla home charger to charge the Mini?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
We have a Model 3 as well and are considering buying the Mini Electric as a second car. What charger do you use for the Mini? Have you looked in to putting an adapter on the Tesla home charger to charge the Mini?
Frankly an adapter might be good to own anyway. There are lots of Tesla destination chargers (as you certainly already know) that you could use with your Mini if you have an adapter.
 

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I got my 2020 SE in March in PA and am loving it. For what it's worth, my cousin who has owned a lot of electric cars including a Leaf, Bolt, and Kia was trying to talk me out of it because of the range. He visited last month and drove it. Quote "Oh now I understand why you wanted this car - it's so quick and fun!"
 

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We have a Model 3 as well and are considering buying the Mini Electric as a second car. What charger do you use for the Mini? Have you looked in to putting an adapter on the Tesla home charger to charge the Mini?
You can just use a home Tesla charger directly - no adapter needed. For destination chargers, it depends on if they are programmed to accept any type 2/ ccs or Tesla only. The charge current can be programmed from the car. Since you can’t set a charge limit we tend to charge the Mini just once or twice a week using a cheap overnight tariff (can be programmed in the car as well), but don’t leave it plugged in to prevent it sitting at 100%.
 

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Except that is 29kWh usable out of a 32.6kWh battery. In other words, "100%" is actually only about 89%. The car won't let you charge to 100%, by design.
All BEVs car including Tesla leave that gap for auxiliary usage. That’s still too high of a level to leave sitting - your the battery electrodes are at that point packed with the salt deposits, that then get “baked in”.

FWIW, indeed that 70% warranty got my attention but in a negative way. My 8 year old Model S had over 90%.

My advice is just as MichaelIC said, don’t let it discharge fully, but also don't’ leave it plugged in at nominal 100%.
 

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You can just use a home Tesla charger directly - no adapter needed.
I thought Teslas have a proprietary charging connector. Are you saying the Tesla home charger has a J-1772 plug?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I thought Teslas have a proprietary charging connector. Are you saying the Tesla home charger has a J-1772 plug?
Teslas do have a proprietary plug. You will need an adapter to convert it to J-1772 in order to charge your Mini.

Something like this:
https://ev-lectron.com/products/lectron-tesla-to-j1772-adapter-white?variant=31881673834542&currency=USD&utm_medium=product_sync&utm_source=google&utm_content=sag_organic&utm_campaign=sag_organic&gclid=CjwKCAjw5p_8BRBUEiwAPpJO6_ituLhnGm3F29Khdqi-SIpFIE2tlS1qnG5K32_8W8QESb167USVcxoCHrUQAvD_BwE

It can also be used at the many Tesla Destination Chargers (but NOT at Superchargers)
 
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